Pushing Boundaries: SSTL, a beckoning prospect

The 'Internet of Logistics' video shows that the concept of Smart & Secure Trade Lanes is a useful and feasible model for supervising cross-border supply chains.

Secure and reliable goods chains – from manufacturer to carrier, and from carrier to customer: wishful thinking or a realistic prospect? The Internet of Logistics video shows that the concept of Smart & Secure Trade Lanes (SSTLs) is a useful and feasible model for the monitoring of cross-border supply chains.

Smart & Secure Trade Lanes are basically the yellow goods flows within the Pushing Boundaries vision of Dutch Customs. The crux of these completely incorruptible goods chains: automated collection and sharing of all relevant data on goods shipments in one single network of reliable networks. All this data is brought together in one single dashboard that – depending on access rights – can be consulted by parties in the logistics chain as and when needed. On top of that, the information needed for Customs’ monitoring activities will be available before the containers are even loaded at the airport or port from where they will be shipped. There are only upsides: greater efficiency, cost savings, greater predictability, and fewer delays at the border.

The Internet of Logistics video shows a demonstration of how SSTLs work, based on projects such as the CORE programme for flower imports from Kenia (see also ‘Customs NL inSight’ issue 3 2018). The video features Frank Heijmann (Dutch Customs), Norbert Kouwenhoven (IBM Tradelens), Roel Huiden (Royal Flora Holland), Gé Coenen (Seacon Logistics), Nanne Onland (Cargonaut), Marty van Pelt (Portbase), and Professor Yao-Hua Tan (Delft University of Technology).

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